CPSC Amends Operating Plan to Reflect Concerns about Testing Burdens

CPSCAs reported by the Toy Industry Association (TIA), on December 13, the U.S. Senate passed an omnibus appropriations bill to fund government operations through next September. The bill included $123 million in funding for the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), which is the amount the agency asked for in its budget request for next year.

The committee report accompanying the bill includes a requirement that the CPSC allocate $1 million to reduce unnecessary and duplicative testing burdens. The language instructs the CPSC to provide a report within 90 days on the status of the agency’s testing burden reduction efforts, as well as a public timeline detailing what steps, if any, the agency will take to reduce testing costs while still assuring compliance. The accompanying report also includes a requirement that $4 million be allocated to import surveillance activities.

On Friday, December 12, the CPSC voted to amend the agency’s fiscal year operating plan for next year, after being strongly urged to use $1 million to find ways to reduce testing burdens. The agency voted 5 to 0 to amend their operating plan to include these funds.

Any questions related to this matter may be directed to the TIA’s Rebecca Mond, director of federal government affairs, at rmond@toyassociation.org.

New York Attorney General Asks Toy Retailers to Be Extra Vigilant About Safety

The New York attorney general has reminded retailers that they are obligated under state and federal law not to sell toxic toys.

As reported by the Associated Press, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman sent letters to 190 retailers. Each letter stated that New York law prohibits the sale, import, and manufacture of children’s products that pose an unreasonable risk of injury, with penalties up to $1,000 per violation.

While federal law requires manufacturers and importers to certify that products comply with children’s product safety rules enforced by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Schneiderman advises retailers to check the CPSC website for product recalls.

He also cites a recent report by Clean & Healthy New York Inc. and the New York League of Conservation Voters Education Fund Inc. that found some children’s items bought in Albany County contained arsenic, mercury, and lead.

CPSC Third-Party Testing Requirements for Children’s Products to Go Into Effect

Courtesy of Toy Industry Association

Third-party test requirements for domestic manufacturers, importers, and private labelers of children’s products will go into effect on February 8. [Read more...]

RECALL: Fisher-Price Recalls to Inspect Rock ‘N Play Infant Sleepers Due to Risk of Exposure to Mold

Fisher-Price has recalled the Newborn Rock ’n Play Sleeper. Mold can develop between the removable seat cushion and the hard plastic frame of the sleeper when it remains wet/moist or is infrequently cleaned, posing a risk of exposure to mold to infants sleeping in the product. [Read more...]

CPSC Approves Plan to Publish Consumer Safety Complaints on Website

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved plans to publish consumer complaints about product safety hazards at www.saferproducts.gov. Beginning in March, the website will collect and post complaints that are sent in by consumers, government agencies, health care professionals, interest groups, and attorneys. Previously, before the passage of CPSIA, federal law required the manufacturer’s consent before information on product-related injuries was released to the public.

Each database entry is expected to include a description of the harm or risk of harm, a description of the product, the manufacturer’s name, the poster’s contact information (which can be kept private), and an affirmation that the complaint is truthful. After the complaint is approved and published, the manufacturer will be forwarded the complaint and will have 10 days to respond to it. If the complaint is proven to be inaccurate, the commission could edit or remove it from the website.

Because public postings can impact a company’s reputation and brand, the Toy Industry Association (TIA) requested that the CPSC take steps to verify that the information is accurate before posting. TIA is also asking that the CPSC beta test the database’s full posting and verification process. The plan was passed with a 3-2 vote.