China Toy Fair


XOS Sponsors Free Webinar to Maximize CPSIA Compliance While Minimizing Costs Under New Testing Requirements

xoslogoXOS will sponsor free webinar on September 26 at 2 p.m. EST. The webinar’s featured speaker is attorney Quin Dodd, noted CPSIA expert and former Chief of Staff at the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). Dodd will provide an overview of new and proposed CPSC regulations and requirements pertaining to the testing and certification of toys and other consumer products. He will also provide concrete suggestions for maximizing compliance while minimizing testing, administrative costs, and compliance risks. Following Dodd’s presentation, Satbir Nayar of XOS, will provide a brief overview of High Definition XRF (HDXRF) technology, with regard to reducing the cost and increasing the effectiveness of heavy metals testing programs.

Combined, the presentations will cover and overview of the current and complex CPSC Testing and Certification Rules, including the 1107, 1109, 1110, and 1112; the proposed new 1110 Certification Rule that may significantly change the who, how, and what of CPSC certificates; strategies to avoid administrative costs and compliance risks with the existing and proposed rules; strategies to minimize the cost and burden of both third-party and in-house (“production”) testing, especially for the CPSC heavy metals limits; and the latest intel regarding the new CSPC commissioners and agency penalty policies, port enforcement, and field investigation activities and tips to avoid problems with any of these. The session will then open up to questions for either of the speakers.

To register for the webinar, click here.

CPSC Approves Plan to Publish Consumer Safety Complaints on Website

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has approved plans to publish consumer complaints about product safety hazards at www.saferproducts.gov. Beginning in March, the website will collect and post complaints that are sent in by consumers, government agencies, health care professionals, interest groups, and attorneys. Previously, before the passage of CPSIA, federal law required the manufacturer’s consent before information on product-related injuries was released to the public.

Each database entry is expected to include a description of the harm or risk of harm, a description of the product, the manufacturer’s name, the poster’s contact information (which can be kept private), and an affirmation that the complaint is truthful. After the complaint is approved and published, the manufacturer will be forwarded the complaint and will have 10 days to respond to it. If the complaint is proven to be inaccurate, the commission could edit or remove it from the website.

Because public postings can impact a company’s reputation and brand, the Toy Industry Association (TIA) requested that the CPSC take steps to verify that the information is accurate before posting. TIA is also asking that the CPSC beta test the database’s full posting and verification process. The plan was passed with a 3-2 vote.

The Toy Book Toy Report-10/5/09

To view this week’s Toy Report, please click here.