National STEM Video Game Challenge Invites Students to Design Their Own Video Games

The National STEM Video Game Challenge—presented by E-Line Media, the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, and the Smithsonian—is accepting student submissions of original video games and game designs. The Challenge motivates youths’ interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) learning by tapping into their passion for playing and creating video games.

The Challenge is accepting entries from U.S. students in the middle and high school categories: The middle school category is open to students in grades 5 to 8, while the high school category is open to students in grades 9 to 12. Both invite entries for individuals and teams of up to four students, and entries can be created using any game creation platform such as Gamestar Mechanic, Unity, GameMaker, and Scratch or a written game design concept document.

Judges will select winners for each game creation platform in both categories, with each winner receiving a cash prize of $1,000, as well as game design and educational software. Each winner’s sponsoring organization will receive a cash prize of $2000.

The National STEM Video Game Challenge is accepting entries through February 25, 2015. Complete guidelines and details on how to enter are available at www.stemchallenge.org.

Second Annual STEM Competition

The National STEM Video Game Challenge is now accepting entries for its annual competition, hosted by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and E-Line Media. Submissions of original video game concepts and designs from students and educators are currently being accepted through March 12.

The challenge aims to motivate students who have an interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) by tapping into their natural passion for playing and making video games. The STEM competition is divided into four categories for individuals and teams: middle school, high school, collegiate, and educator.

Entries can be created by using any game-making platform, including, but not limited to, written concepts, Gamestar Mechanic, Microsoft’s Kodu Game Lab, GameMaker, and Scratch.

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