China Toy Fair


CPSC Releases CHAP Report on Phthalates and Phthalate Alternatives

Following four years of investigation by the Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel (CHAP), appointed by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the CPSC has released a long-awaited report detailing the potential health effects of phthalates and phthalate alternatives in toys and child care articles. Phthalates are substances used to make certain plastics soft and pliable, and there exist federal restrictions on the presence of phthalates in toys and certain children’s products.

Under the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) of 2008, there are currently permanent bans on three types of phthalates—DEHP, DBP and BBP—in toys and certain child care articles, and interim bans on three additional phthalates—DINP, DIDP and DnOP—in mouth-able components of these products. [Read more...]

CPSC to Host Workshop on Possible Amendments to Import Filing Requirements

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) will host a workshop on September 18 to share information and gather data on proposed changes to certificate of compliance requirements for companies that import regulated finished consumer products into the U.S.

The workshop will allow CPSC to clarify issues and understand stakeholders’ concerns related to the proposed amendments to the Certification of Compliance Rule, which would require companies that import products manufactured outside of the U.S. to file general conformity certifications—or children’s product certifications—electronically with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) prior to importation, in conjunction with other customs entry documents. [Read more...]

CPSC Joins International Effort to Prevent Button Battery-Related Injuries and Fatalities

During International Product Safety Week, June 16 to 20, a bi-annual meeting of government, industry, and consumer organizations, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), and counterparts from 12 other countries and jurisdictions have teamed up to make button battery safety a global priority.

This past Tuesday, in Brussels, Belgium, CPSC representatives and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) discussed dangers associated with coin-size batteries, aka coin cell batteries. These are used in an increasing number of small electronics around the home, and are frequently left within a child’s reach. Incidents of young children and seniors unintentionally swallowing the batteries have resulted in thousands of reports of injuries worldwide.

CPSC reached out to battery manufacturers and is encouraged by recent efforts that have resulted in new safety warnings and packaging changes. CPSC is working with industry, public health officials, and the global community to continue the progress of preventing coin cell battery-related incidents.

Parents and caregivers, meanwhile, are urged to keep products containing these batteries away from children.

U.S. CPSC Now Accepting Comments on Third-Party Testing Costs

Last Thursday, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) hosted a day-long public workshop to gather technical information and evidence that could help to reduce third party testing costs for manufacturers of toys and children’s products sold in the U.S.

Held at the CPSC’s National Product Testing and Evaluation Center in Rockville, Md., the workshop featured presentations of technical data by representatives of industry, consumer groups, and academic institutions. Alan Kaufman, senior vice president of technical affairs for the Toy Industry Association (TIA), and Rebecca Mond, TIA director of federal government affairs, were both on-hand on behalf of the toy industry.

The technical data will assist the CPSC in determining which material types do not contain any of the six banned phthalates, lead, and/or heavy metals listed in the ASTM F963 Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Toy Safety, and therefore do not need to be routinely tested. [Read more...]

CPSC Issues New Report on Toy Safety System Effectiveness, Shows Recalls Are Down

CPSCDuring the past five years, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have stopped more than 9.8 million units of about 3,000 different toys that violated applicable standards. These products never made it onto store shelves and were kept out of consumers’ homes.

In recent years, the CPSC has created a robust toy safety system by requiring testing by independent, third party laboratories around the world; enforcing stringent lead and phthalates limits for toys; and stopping violative and dangerous toys at ports. This fiscal year, CPSC issued only 31 toy recalls, none of which involved a lead violation. This compares with 172 toy recalls in fiscal year 2008 (19 of which were due to excessive lead); 50 recalls in 2009 (14 for lead); 46 recalls in fiscal year 2010 (3 for lead); 34 recalls in 2011 (4 for lead); and 38 recalls last year (3 for lead).

Overall, toy-related deaths involving kids younger than 15 decreased from 19 in 2010, to 17 in 2011, and 11 last year (based on reports to date). The majority of toy-related fatalities last year were attributed to riding toys, including tricycles and nonmotorized scooters. For kids younger than 15 years old, non-motorized scooters were also the category of toys associated with the most injuries last year. Frequently, these injuries involved lacerations, contusions, and abrasions to the kid’s face and head. [Read more...]

ISO Meetings Explore Toy Safety Guidelines

Courtesy of the Toy Industry Association

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee on Toy Safety recently held meetings to discuss the development of global age determination guidelines for toys, based largely on the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission’s guidelines from 2002. The meetings, which were held in Tokyo, also discussed magnets, cords, impaction, phthalates, total concentration of certain elements, and the alignment of toy standards.

Technical experts from the U.S.—including representatives from toy manufacturers and importers, testing labs, and the Toy Industry Association (TIA)—and industry and product safety agencies from more than a dozen countries also attended the discussions.

ASTM International held its third annual meeting with ISO to share information and work for further alignment. Issues such as battery and magnet ingestion were discussed. A detailed report from the U.S delegation will be available for viewing on the TIA Website upon completion.

EU and OECD Develop, Launch New Global Recalls Portal

Courtesy of Toy Industry Association

A new “Global Recalls Portal” was launched in Brussels, Belgium on October 19 to facilitate the exchange of information among government representatives, consumers and businesses about recalled products in jurisdictions around the world, according to a news release from TIA.

Developed jointly by the EU and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), including countries such as the U.S., Australia, and Canada, the portal was unveiled during International Product Safety Week. Paola Testori Coggi, director general in the Directorate General for Health and Consumers at the European Commission (SANCO); Rintaro Tamaki, OECD deputy secretary general; and Inez Tenenbaum, chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission were on hand at the launch.

The portal will allow consumers to search products they intend to buy to see if any safety alerts have been issued, help businesses to track emerging hazards from around the world, and aid governments in removing unsafe products from the market.

To view the portal, visit www.globalrecalls.oecd.org.

Bumbo Baby Seats Recalled

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with Bumbo International Trust of South Africa, announced a voluntary recall of the Bumbo Baby Seats. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

The Bumbo Baby Seat is being recalled because babies can maneuver out of or fall from the Bumbo seat, posing a risk of serious injuries. Consumers should immediately stop using the product until they order and install a free repair kit, which includes a restraint belt with a warning label, installation instructions, safe use instructions, and a new warning sticker. The belt should always be used when a child is placed in the seat. Even with the belt, the seat should never be used on any raised surface. Consumers should also immediately stop using Bumbo seat covers that interfere with the installation and use of the belt. A video demonstrating proper installation of the restraint belt and proper use of the Bumbo seat is available at www.recall.BumboUSA.com.

Order the free repair kit by visiting www.recall.BumboUSA.com or calling (866) 898-4999 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Thursday and between 8 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. CT on Friday. Do not return the Bumbo seat to retailers as they will not be able to provide the repair kit.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about your experience with the product on SaferProducts.gov.

Firm’s Recall Hotline: (866) 898-4999
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

SOURCE U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

This post was originally written by Ali Mierzejewski and published by ToyBook.com. For more news, visit www.toybook.com, follow The Toy Book on Twitter, and like The Toy Book on Facebook. The Toy Book is a bimonthly trade magazine covering the toy industry, published by Adventure Publishing Group.

Green Toys Recalls Mini Vehicles Due to Choking Hazard

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada, in cooperation with Green Toys, Inc., have announced a voluntary recall of Green Toys Mini Vehicles. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed.

The vehicles have been recalled because the wheels and hubcaps on the toy cars can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children. Consumers who own the following mini vehicles, manufactured between March and June of this year, should contact Green Toys for a full refund:  Mini Vehicle Set, Mini Ambulance, Mini Vehicle Assortment, Mini Red Fastback, Mini Police Car, Mini Taxi, and Mini Fastback Set. Cars with an “I” etched into the underside of the car next to the date stamp are not part of the recall.

For additional information, contact Green Toys toll-free at (888) 973-3421 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday or visit the firm’s website at www.greentoys.com/recall.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Tell them about your experience with the product on SaferProducts.gov.

This post was originally written by Sierra McCleary-Harris and published by ToyBook.com. For more news, visit www.toybook.com, follow The Toy Book on Twitter, and like The Toy Book on Facebook. The Toy Book is a bimonthly trade magazine covering the toy industry, published by Adventure Publishing Group.

Recalled: Discovery Kids Animated Marine and Safari Lamps

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a voluntary recall notice that users of  the Discovery Kids Animated Marine and Safari Lamps should stop using the product due to fire hazards. The product, from Innovage LLC, has received 11 reports of short circuiting. This includes three reports of lamps catching fire, which led to property damage. No injuries have been reported to date.

The product is hazardous due to the placement of internal wires near the circuit board can cause electrical short-circuiting and sparking.

The recalled products have an 11-digit batch number that begins with either 584894 or 10128 and a model number of 1628626, 1642433, 1641522, 1641523, 1645729, or 1645853. Batch numbers can be found imprinted in the plastic underneath the lamps and on the bottom of the packaging.

Animated Marine and Safari Lamps are sold at Bed Bath & Beyond, Bonton, JCPenney, Kohls, Office Max, and Toys “R” Us stores nationwide, in addition to online retailers such as, Amazon, Ideeli, JCPenney, Kohls, Macy’s, and Overstock.

Consumers should contact Innovage in order to obtain information on returning the product and receiving a full refund. Call (888) 232-1535 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. PST Monday through Friday, visit the firm’s website at www.innovage.net or www.lamprecall.org, or e-mail info@lamprecall.org

This post was originally written by Gigi Rubin and published by ToyBook.com. For more news, visit www.toybook.com, follow The Toy Book on Twitter, and like The Toy Book on Facebook. The Toy Book is a bimonthly trade magazine covering the toy industry, published by Adventure Publishing Group