New Product Labeling Required for Toys Containing DINP for Sale in California

Under California’s Proposition 65, manufacturers of consumer products for sale in California will be required to include a warning label on items containing diisononyl phthalate (DINP). As reported by the Toy Industry Association (TIA), the law does not include a “safe harbor” level for DINP, and as such, companies with products containing any amount of the substance are required to comply. The requirement goes into effect on December 20.

Last year, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) added DINP to Proposition 65, which requires the labeling of products containing any one of the approximately 800 chemicals of concern identified by the state.

Under the federally mandated Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA), DINP is restricted to maximum levels of 0.1 percent in mouthable toys and components and remains legal for use in non-mouthable toys and inaccessible components. TIA members and industry stakeholders that sell toys in California are advised to include the required warning label on all packaging of products that may contain any levels of DINP.

Any questions may be directed to TIA’s Alan Kaufman, senior vice president of technical affairs, at akaufman@toyassociation.org.

CPSC Joins International Effort to Prevent Button Battery-Related Injuries and Fatalities

During International Product Safety Week, June 16 to 20, a bi-annual meeting of government, industry, and consumer organizations, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), and counterparts from 12 other countries and jurisdictions have teamed up to make button battery safety a global priority.

This past Tuesday, in Brussels, Belgium, CPSC representatives and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) discussed dangers associated with coin-size batteries, aka coin cell batteries. These are used in an increasing number of small electronics around the home, and are frequently left within a child’s reach. Incidents of young children and seniors unintentionally swallowing the batteries have resulted in thousands of reports of injuries worldwide.

CPSC reached out to battery manufacturers and is encouraged by recent efforts that have resulted in new safety warnings and packaging changes. CPSC is working with industry, public health officials, and the global community to continue the progress of preventing coin cell battery-related incidents.

Parents and caregivers, meanwhile, are urged to keep products containing these batteries away from children.

European Commission Updates EU Toy Safety Standards

EC.logoThe Toy Industry Association (TIA) has reported that earlier this month the European Commission (EC) published a revised “Guidance Document on Technical Documentation” to help manufacturers and importers of toys in the EU demonstrate compliance with requirements of the EU Toy Safety Directive (TSD).

Revisions include a model letter that toy companies can use to remind suppliers about the need to provide a list of materials, chemicals, and components, as well as a model sub-declaration for suppliers to obtain a guarantee that the supplied parts and components have been assessed and comply with appropriate toy safety requirements. The updated guidance document can be viewed at the EC’s website.

The EC also amended restrictions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to include limits for allowable PAHs in rubber and plastic articles with prolonged skin or mouth contact. The new regulation goes into effect in two years.

CPSC Issues New Report on Toy Safety System Effectiveness, Shows Recalls Are Down

CPSCDuring the past five years, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) have stopped more than 9.8 million units of about 3,000 different toys that violated applicable standards. These products never made it onto store shelves and were kept out of consumers’ homes.

In recent years, the CPSC has created a robust toy safety system by requiring testing by independent, third party laboratories around the world; enforcing stringent lead and phthalates limits for toys; and stopping violative and dangerous toys at ports. This fiscal year, CPSC issued only 31 toy recalls, none of which involved a lead violation. This compares with 172 toy recalls in fiscal year 2008 (19 of which were due to excessive lead); 50 recalls in 2009 (14 for lead); 46 recalls in fiscal year 2010 (3 for lead); 34 recalls in 2011 (4 for lead); and 38 recalls last year (3 for lead).

Overall, toy-related deaths involving kids younger than 15 decreased from 19 in 2010, to 17 in 2011, and 11 last year (based on reports to date). The majority of toy-related fatalities last year were attributed to riding toys, including tricycles and nonmotorized scooters. For kids younger than 15 years old, non-motorized scooters were also the category of toys associated with the most injuries last year. Frequently, these injuries involved lacerations, contusions, and abrasions to the kid’s face and head. [Read more...]

TIA Presents Toy Safety Seminar for Chinese Manufacturers

Toy Industry Association (TIA)tia_logo[1] will co-present a Toy Safety Seminar on October 18 in Shanghai, China as part of its ongoing commitment to industry education. Since 1996, the TIA has conducted such seminars to provide factories with information on the most up-to-date U.S. standards, testing, and conformance requirements. This year, representatives from the TIA, along with experts from Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the industry, will share their practical understanding of the requirements. CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum will also give  key presentation.

The upcoming Toy Safety Seminar will cover key toy safety information and U.S. compliance requirements such as:

  • U.S. toy safety standards and regulations, including recent legislative changes and their impact on Chinese manufacturers and suppliers.
  • The role of the CPSC as the lead U.S. government body responsible for monitoring and enforcing toy safety in the U.S.
  • Necessary elements of a factory quality program.
  • Emerging issues and hazards and how they are being addressed.
  • Ensuring material safety and reporting.

UL-STR to Present Toy Safety Seminar on Regulatory Changes

UL-STR, an independent provider of quality assurance testing, audit, inspection, and responsible sourcing services for the consumer products industry, will present a toy safety seminar, Toy Safety—Implications of Regulatory Changes, on September 12 at its UK laboratory in Reading. The toy safety training event is part of an ongoing seminar series on the latest quality assurance issues.

The seminar will provide an update on changes in legislation that affect toy manufacturers and others in the toy supply chain who distribute products in the EU and North America. Topics will include: the EU Toy Safety Directive and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act; other overlapping regulations and requirements, such as the RoHS directive, the Cosmetics Regulation, and REACH; responsibilities of parties; and an update on supporting standards.

Keith Richards, technical director for European Toys and Children’s Products at UL-STR, who has over 25 years of experience in toy and consumer product testing, will lead the session. The session runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on September 12. To register, email QAenquiries@ul.com.

This post was originally written by Loren Moreno and published by ToyBook.com. For more news, visit www.toybook.com, follow The Toy Book on Twitter, and like The Toy Book on Facebook. The Toy Book is a bimonthly trade magazine covering the toy industry, published by Adventure Publishing Group.

EU Committee Advises Commission on New Safety Assessment for Plastic Toys

According to Plastic & Rubber Weekly (PWR), the European Union’s (EU) Scientific Committee on Health and Environmental Risks has advised the European Commission that safety assessments of plastic toys should consider overall risk and take account of their likely uses, rather than just focus on the toxicity of substances in the products. The advisory was issued following a request from the commission for guidance on the toys safety directive.

[Read more...]

Health Canada Revisits Toy Safety Legislation

Health Canada, the national public health department of the country, is revising its toy safety legislation and has opened a review period for all stakeholders. Health Canada legislates requirements for “toys, equipment, and other products for use by a child in learning or play,” and in order for those products to be legally advertised, sold, or imported in Canada, the products much meet all the restrictions defined in the legislation (the Hazardous Products Act and the Hazardous Products (Toys) Regulations).

[Read more...]

CPSC to Hold Town Hall Meeting Tomorrow on Toy Safety

cpsc_logo

Inez Tenenbaum, Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) chairman, will hold a town hall meeting at Toys “R” Us Times Square on November 17 at 9:30 a.m. ET to answer consumers’ questions and concerns about toy safety hazards and requirements.  Tenenbaum, who will be joined by Jerry Storch, chairman and CEO of Toys “R” Us, and Alan Korn, executive director and general counsel of Safe Kids USA, will also talk about the steps the agency is taking to ensure that children’s toys are safe.

[Read more...]